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Mr. Badiee (played by Homayoun Ershadi), a middle-aged man, intends to commit suicide and digs his grave next to a tree. He wants to take his sleeping pills together and sleep in this grave at night. Badiee is looking for someone who will bury his body tomorrow morning after his death. On the way to find such a person, he encounters various people, such as a soldier, an Afghan student, and a man who works at the Museum of Natural History, and asks them to come to him tomorrow morning and pour “twenty shovels of dirt” on him and put an envelope with Take 200,000 tomans of money in the car dashboard as a salary. The soldier rejects the offer and flees to his barracks. The Afghan student begins a rhetorical sermon, calling suicide against the teachings of Islam and the Qur’an, but the museum worker, who later turns out to have hunted birds such as quail and partridges for taxidermy in the museum. A story from the day of his suicide and how “the taste of a berry prevented his suicide” accepts his offer. At the end of the film, while we are waiting to see the fate of “Badie”, the filming changes and we see behind-the-scenes images of the director and the film crew and Homayoun Ershadi coming out of the grave. He finally reaches a new understanding of the meaning of life. Winner of the Palme d’Or at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival Nominated for the Silver Shahrokh Award by the Argentine Film Critics Association 1997 Winner of the Boston Film Critics Association Award for Best Foreign Language Film Nominated for the 1997 Telluride International Film Festival Winner of the Best Foreign Language Film Award 1998 Istanbul 1999 Analysis and Comments In addition to the reception it received, Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert listed the taste of cherries in the 1997 list of films he avoids as boring. After watching the film, Roger noted that after watching the film, Chicago Reader Jonathan Rosenbaum and New York Daily News critic Dave Kehr, who both agree, met in his hotel lobby, believing it was a masterpiece, but Ebert believes he saw a kingdom without clothes. [1] Time Magazine named Cherry Flavor one of the top 10 films in history in 2009. [2] The British Film Foundation named Cherry Flavor one of the top ten films in the contemporary history of concept cinema in 2012. “This film is one of the most dramatic works with brilliant dialogues,” Andsvand wrote in an article on the taste of cherries. The Criterion Collection introduced the film in its 1999 collection. The Guardian magazine ranked cherry flavor second in the 2018 list of top Palme d’Or winners in Cannes history. Bardshaw has described the taste of cherries in 2018: Undoubtedly, this film is a masterpiece by Abbas Kia Rostami, one of the greatest poets of cinema. A film with a strange, beautiful and sad story that even now can not be interpreted exactly. The Criterion Collection introduced the film in its 1999 collection. The Guardian magazine ranked cherry flavor second in the 2018 list of top Palme d’Or winners in Cannes history. Bardshaw has described the taste of cherries in 2018: Undoubtedly, this film is a masterpiece by Abbas Kia Rostami, one of the greatest poets of cinema. A film with a strange, beautiful and sad story that even now can not be interpreted exactly. The Criterion Collection introduced the film in its 1999 collection. The Guardian magazine ranked cherry flavor second in the 2018 list of top Palme d’Or winners in Cannes history. Bardshaw has described the taste of cherries in 2018: Undoubtedly, this film is a masterpiece by Abbas Kia Rostami, one of the greatest poets of cinema. A film with a strange, beautiful and sad story that even now can not be interpreted exactly.

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